Category Archives: Faversham

Iron Wharf boatyard, Faversham

Nathalie Banaigs has drawn my attention to this picture by Mark Sewell of Iron Wharf boatyard, a working boatyard on Faversham Creek.   It’s good to see boats being worked on in Faversham.
iron wharf boatyard

 

 

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Martin Phillips calls for positive recognition that barge building skills are still thriving

Martin Phillips has today posted a comment to our piece about the film of “The Quay”.   It appears of course on that post, but it is necessary to click on “Comment” in order to see it.    It deserves more prominence, so we repeat it in full here:-

“It is very sad that the landowner’s wish to develop the site has destroyed what had been developed at Standard Quay; however I feel that the coverage of this to date rather ignores reality of what has been achieved by the Thames barge and trad boat community in East Anglia.

It is depressing to read such statements as:  ‘A centre for ancient maritime crafts, the quay is a haven for the few dozen surviving Thames sailing barges.   But Standard Quay’s latest owner, a property developer, plans to turn it into a tourist trap with shops, restaurants and luxury houses….’

This publicity would give the impression that this was the last home of sailing barges and that the preservation skills of barge shipwrights and the home of barges has been destroyed for good by a property developer’s greed.

However this is simply a false picture. What had been achieved at Faversham in the comparatively recent past particularly around the rebuild of Cambria was great, and of course Tim Goldsack is still operating his business (albeit not at Standard Quay). The Iron Wharf is still thriving as are the regular Faversham barges Mirosa and Repertor and Lady of the Lea.

Why can’t someone make an optimistic film publicising the achievements of the TSBT (formerly the barge club) in keeping its barges sailing over the last 64 years, rebuilding two (Pudge and Centaur) WITHOUT Lottery support and taking thousands of people sailing? The Trust’s third hand/mate  training  has produced  about 8 of the current Sailing Barge masters (including myself). It has done so much good to preserve barges and helped to bring people into the  barge scene who go on to work on barges. Let’s celebrate this success please!

Maldon and the Blackwater are  home to a very active fleet of barges and two barge yard (Cooks and Blackwater Marina) with blocks and  2 drydocks operating. Then there is Andy Harman’s yard at St Osyth not to forget the Pioneer rebuild and all the smacks. TS rigging has a thriving trad boat business (rerigging the Cutty Sark for example) and there is a host of evidence that the area is a hot bed of traditional skills and specialist shipwrights, riggers, metal workers, a blacksmith and much much more all based around the rich maritime heritage of the area. Topsail Charters have built a successful business over a quarter of a century preserving a fleet of active barges carrying thousands of passengers a year and employing a group of skippers and mates.

Then there are the barges themselves and the unseen efforts and huge financial commitments of private owners that has produced the wonderful sight of beautifully restored and maintained barges like Marjorie, Adieu, Edith May, Lady Daphne, Repertor, Wyvenhoe,  Lady of the Lea and Phoenician and many others . Private owners are rebuilding barges like Melissa and Niagara, Ethel Maud etc, with more on the way and two new builds completed and more on the way.

I deplore the problems that have ruined all Brian Pain’s efforts to achieve a laudable goal but the picture is far from gloomy! Traditional skills are actually thriving in East Anglia and the fleet of barges and smacks is an often unpublicised gem. Where else in the UK  has a fleet of traditional craft in their home waters been preserved and transformed from cargo carriers and fishing boats to working and pleasure vessels?

Yes what happened at Standard Quay was bad for one person’s dream and destroyed his hopes for the future. I dare say it was undoubtedly bad for Faversham – but that is quite a big issue and no doubt many will debate what is best for the town and the use of its creek for many years to come. 

Let’s celebrate what we are really  achieving guys! Please can someone make a film to show what has been achieved and what a wonderful tradition we have kept going. Tell the public and above all encourage them to join in and come sailing on our wonderful craft.”

Martin has set out a view with which I certainly agree.   It does often seem that Maldon and the other places on the Essex and Suffolk coast are somewhat ignored by some leaders of the barge world.   As he says, there is a thriving barge community in East Anglia, with barge yards, wonderful craftsmen, and a fleet of magnificent vessels who call it their home. 

Barging about the Rivers – in the Sun!

Much better weather around the Thames area makes it a grand weekend for the barges.  Here’s what some of them have to say over the last couple of days:-            

Peter Phillips says, Thalatta doing what she does best!  Cyril, Roger, Rita and a barge load of children cruising the Blackwater.”  (photo – Peter Phillips)

Thames Barge Orinoco says, “Fantastic charter yesterday!  And again today;  all sitting in the sunshine on the deck watching the world go by.”  (photo – sb Orinoco)

Annie Meadows says, “We have 45 artists on board today;  hoping I will be allowed to photograph some of their work.”

Cambria is at Pin Mill, where Richard Titchener, Hilary Halajko and the Sea Change youngsters on board have been busy.   Dave Brooks went to visit them and took some pictures.  

Dave says, “Cambria is on the blocks at Pin Mill, and Skipper Richard Titchener is showing the way as Sea Change do a fantastic job of painting her up in readiness for the Thames match next weekend.”   (photo – Dave Brooks)

Dave goes on to say “The locals didn’t recognize her with the black leeboards, so when in Pin Mill do as Bob Roberts would have done and paint them.”   Cambria now has tri-colour leeboards.   (photo – Dave Brooks)

Dave had something else to tell us too.   “For the first time in over 40 years Cambria returns to Pin Mill.  It stirred a few memories of some of the people living there who remember her from the Bob Roberts days.”  (Photo – Dave Brooks)

Meanwhile two special events are going on today:-   the Harwich Sea Festival and Lifeboat Day and the Nautical Festival at Faversham.   Lovely weather for both of them, with lots of good things to see and do, and a great atmosphere. 

And now Ed Gransden joins in to tell us, “Sailing past Horrid hill, riverside.  Cracking day today  –  I knew this summer would be a good one….” 

 

 

                                                                                                              

Orinoco likened to a cat called Ulysses!

Found on the internet today, a nice little piece about Orinoco.   It was on the Geograph website, which has the tag line, “photograph every web square”.                                            

And here’s what the website says about the photo:-

“The sailing barge ‘Orinoco’, moored at Iron Wharf, Faversham Creek.

“A calm, warmish June evening  –  warmer than many in June 2012.   In the distance, the unmistakable silhouette of Oyster Bay House, with its hoist high above the creek.   A little nearer, there is what looks rather like the awning over a railway station platform  –  this has in fact been rigged up over a vessel undergoing restoration.

“I love the idea of giving the adventurous name ‘Orinoco’ to a modest coastal-going Thames barge  –  it’s a bit like calling your cat Ulysses.”

Cambria’s winter work ready for first sails of 2012

The Barge Blog has been so busy that there was no time to publish Dave Brooks’s winter report from Cambria earlier, but here it is.

“It has been a busy close season for the Cambria.  Many of our objectives have been achieved, though some will have to carried forward to next year.

“The main focus of this close season was to have the Rotary Club Logo painted into the tops’l, (Rotary International is a sponsor of Cambria), which has been completed, and to replace our old ‘whippy’ bowsprit, which has been fitted.

“Sailing plans started with Cambria leaving Faversham on Friday 20th April, under Richard Titchener, and arriving in Gravesend on the 22nd to sit on the new pontoon at Gravesend Town Pier as part of its opening event.  We had the barge open to the public as much as possible, although the weather didn’t do much to encourage visitors. She left Gravesend on the 4th May to return to Faversham where her re-dedication ceremony took place on Standard Quay on the 9th May.

“We expect to be racing in the Medway Match on the 26th May, the Thames Match on the 28th July and the Colne Match on the 8th September.

“The sailing season is back.”

Photo by Dave Brooks shows Cambria lying at the Gravesend Town Pier Pontoon, and yes, Matt C and Jeremy T, that is the power station!  

A craftsman at work – the sailmaker

It was a really cold, wet day, and as we sat aboard Cambria waiting for the Gravesend crowds to come and view her, we were not that surprised that they didn’t flock down on to the new pontoon.   Some came, a few brave souls with children wanting to see what it was all about.

And then, about 4 o’clock my day was made really worthwhile.

Cambria had a tear in her topsail that needed to be repaired before she goes back to Faversham at the end of the week, and she was expecting the sailmaker.   A dripping wet figure in wellies and waterproofs descended the ladder, and it was Steve Hall the sailmaker from North Sea Sails of Tollesbury.   He is one of the very few traditional sailmakers left.

He set to work, expertly measuring the size of the piece of canvas he needed, cutting it, and then sewing it neatly into place with small, regular stitches.    This all done on the splendid topsail that he himself had made not that long ago.   He made it look easy, but it’s only easy if you know how and have years of experience.   And all the while he talked in the wonderful real Essex tones, (not that rubbish you hear on TOWIE and similar programmes, which is actually part London and part transatlantic TV speak).

We had a long discussion as fellow enthusiasts of Jeeves and Wooster, but Steve’s much better at it than I am, and can quote reams of it.

And I felt then as I watched him, and I still feel now, that I have been truly privileged to spend the afternoon in the company of a master craftsman and watch him at his work.  

(Tricia)                                                                                       (photo – Dave Brooks)

Pudge and Centaur get ready for the season

Roger Newlyn sends us news that Pudge left Faversham last weekend, Sunday the 1st of April, following  completion of the shipwright’s work, and she arrived back in Maldon on  the evening flood tide.    Work has now commenced on fitting out the restored  stern section down below.    Her gear was being lowered this weekend for routine  maintenance, ready for the forthcoming season.

Meanwhile Good Friday saw Centaur  rigging out alongside Pudge, preparing for her shakedown  sail.

Save the Barge “WESTMORELAND” says Roger on RootsChat.com

There’s news about the present plight of Westmoreland in a post by Roger on the Web Forum, RootsChat.com.  

He writes that Geoff Gransden, who is Project Manager for Westmoreland’s restoration, had hoped to carry out the work at Lower Halstow, her home port for sixty years.

After Colin Frake bought her, some immediate repairs were carried out at Standard Quay, Faversham, but she had to move from there.   At present she is in a lighter at Otterham.   A lottery bid is being made for funding to carry out the restoration.

Lower Halstow Parish Council was asked to agree to the restoration of Westmoreland being carried out at the dock.   There is apparently considerable public support in the village for Westmoreland to “come home”.   At first the Parish Council was split on whether to give permission, but now its members have voted unanimously to refuse, so Westmoreland has no base for her restoration.

Roger is asking for support in trying to change the Parish Council’s decision.   Here’s the link to the story: 

http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=591047.msg4417870;topicseen

Roger also gives some websites where well-wishers can record their views, and here they are:-  

http://www.edithmaybargecharter.co.uk/westmoreland-restoration/

http://www.lowerhalstowpc.kentparishes.gov.uk/default.cfm?pid=messages

News of Cambria, Repertor and Kitty

Busy weekend in the barge world.

Cambria left dry dock at Faversham yesterday, and here’s Repertor already onRepertor arrives at Faversham today to go into dry dock vacated by Cambria yesterday the way to take her place in the dry dock.

Meanwhile today more work is done on Cambria, and here’s Tim Goldsack working on her new bowsprit.

Tim Goldsack shaping Cambria's new bowsprit

At the other great home of barges, Maldon, the Quay saw Kitty getting attention.   JP Lodge says “…lowering down, sanding and painting the topmast truck, preparing to rig out and heave up maybe next weekend.”

Photographs by Dave Brooks

Cambria starred in John Sergeant programme

Excellent programme tonight.  John Sergeant was very interested in all going on.   Strange that his second visit was to Faversham, but no mention of boats of any sort, or that Cambria was restored there.   The section on Cambria was lovely, and both Richard Titchener and Tim Goldsack came over well in their interviews.   JS was very complimentary about the Cambria Trust and the quality of the restoration.

New skipper for the Cambria? John Sergeant

All in all, a good night for Cambria and a good night for barges. 

(Pictures courtesy of Dave Brooks)

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