Category Archives: Barge People

Deben is Cambria’s Volunteer of the Year

Across on the ferry to Gravesend today for the Cambria Trust AGM,

Highlight of the event was the presentation to the Cambria dscf1151Volunteer of the Year. The Cambria Cup was presented by Tony Farnham, Cambria’s Honorary Ambassador, to Deben Johnson.

Deben is 17 and has volunteered with sb Cambria for two and a half years. He has sailed as Third Hand on the barge, and has also put his skills to good use on board. As a woodwork apprentice he has carried out considerable work on the barge boat as well as on the barge itself, including work on all the wooden blocks.

The Cambria Cup was won by Cambria in 1930 and subsequently passed into Tony’s ownership. He donated it to the Cambria Trust to be used in this way.

Sorry for the poor quality of the photo  –  I was not in a good position to take it, either that or the lens was very dirty! 

Hugh’s photo of Tollesbury at Standard Quay

I’m very sorry there have been no posts on The Barge Blog since August.   September, October and most of November are my busiest months in “real life” and I just don’t have the time to deal with it, although I do manage the occasional post to the Society’s Facebook page.

Members of the Society should now have received the autumn edition of our excellent magazine Mainsheet  –  and if you aren’t a member and don’t have Mainsheet then you’re really missing something.   Mainsheet contained the news that Hugh Perks has stood down from the Committee of SSBR.   Tollesbury October 2015We are all very sad that he has come to this decision, although we understand his reasons.   Hugh is a founder member of the Society, has held office and has brought his vast knowledge of maritime subjects to our deliberations and indeed to our publications.  

Thankfully, Hugh has said that he intends to continue to bombard us with letters, notes, corrections, etc, to keep the Committee on its toes.   And as good as his word, he has sent us this splendid photograph of sb Tollesbury.   He says:- “Tollesbury is now based at Standard Quay, Faversham, as her former berth at Barking is no longer available. She is looking very smart and well painted up.   Her mast and topmast need attention, but the sprit is newly painted.   The foliage in pots on the decks and hatches surely qualifies her for the “Valdora Trophy”.   Old timers may remember Valdora the ‘flowerpot’ barge at Great Yarmouth in the early 1950s.

“Also at Standard Quay is sb Decima, sporting somewhat virulent green paint in places, and sb Repertor is berthed opposite. “

 

Happy in his work!

Here’s SSBR Committee Member, Dave Brooks, at work today.   But what is he doing?

Dave Brooks 15 04 17

(Picture courtesy of Maggs Casey Kelly)

Tony Farnham presents picture to Cambria Trust

Off on the Ferry to Gravesend today for the Cambria Trust Tony Farnham presents picture to Cambria Trust at AGM 2015Annual General Meeting, held at the Port of London Authority headquarters at London River House.   The Cambria Trust, of course, owns and maintains the sailing barge Cambria, renowned as the last UK registered vessel to trade under sail alone.   A wooden Thames sailing barge, she still has no engine and is completely dependent on the wind.

The AGM was well attended, and it was good to see a number of people who had not met since last year’s meeting.   Chairman, Bruce Richardson, reported on a busy year with charters by Rotary International District 1120 and the Sea-Change Sailing Trust, both using the barge for sail training.   Cambria had taken part in several of the annual barge matches, doing well, and had been at the Classic Boat Festival in St Katharine’s Dock in September, where on several days she had welcomed 1,000 visitors.

A highlight of the day was the presentation to the Trust of a splendid framed picture of Cambria taking part in the Thames Match of 1936.   The picture was a gift to the Trust from Tony and Sandy Farnham, and in handing it over Tony said that he hoped the picture would be installed on board the barge.   Our picture shows Tony Farnham, right,  presenting the picture to Bruce Richardson.

Picture courtesy of Dave Brooks

David Wood RIP

We were very sorry indeed to learn of the death of SSBR Committee Member, David Wood.

As well as being a long-term member of the Committee himself, David has been an enormous help to his wife, Elizabeth, in her office as our Chairman.

David has written a number of publications over the years, and members will recall that within the last few months they have received a copy of “Still in the Samphire”, the 50th anniversary history of the Society, and of “The Prowess of Charlie Fielder”.   Both of these were written by David Wood, and he has put some considerable years of work into them.   Elizabeth tells us that he was still researching and writing other material.

David died very suddenly on Friday 30th January 2015.   He was alone at their Twickenham house while Elizabeth was at her family’s home in Sussex.    She was talking to David on the telephone, when suddenly she heard a noise, he stopped speaking and she could not raise him.   She called a neighbour who went to the house, and discovered that David had suffered a heart attack which he did not survive.   It has taken a long time for the post mortem to be held, and the death certificate has only just been issued.

The funeral is to be held next week.   In accordance with David’s own wishes it is to be a small low-key occasion for close friends and family.   Donations in David’s memory if desired may be sent to the Thames Sailing Barge Trust, c/o Roger Newlyn.   Please contact us by e-mail if you need Roger’s address.     SocSailingBargeResearch@gmail.com

On behalf of the Committee and members of the Society, we send our most sincere sympathy to Elizabeth and her family.

A new chapter for Decima?

News today that sb Decima is up for sale.   The Apollo Duck website has an advertisement from MJLewis Boatsales of Maldon offering the 1899-built Thames sailing barge for sale at £160,000.

Decima off Southend Pier, Southend Match 2013.

Decima off Southend Pier, Southend Match 2013.

Decima was built by FG Fay & Co of Southampton, being one of twenty identical steel barges built by the company for EJ Goldsmith’s of Grays, who traded her until the late 1940s.   The 67 ton, 85 foot barge’s history includes ownership by Rayfields of Gravesend, and then Greenhithe Lighterage as a motor barge.

She was sold out of trade to Dennis Wildish in 1977 and he re-rigged her as a charter barge. In 1999 she was sold to Jeremy Taunton as a houseboat.

Master shipwright and well-known sailing barge restorer Tim Goldsack, her present owner, bought Decima in 2003 and started a major restoration.   She was gutted and a substantial number of the hull and deck plates were replaced. She was given a new set of rigging and good second-hand sails.   A new Gardner 6LXB engine was fitted.   Decima has three cabins, with six berths, and central heating was installed when her owner lived aboard her for two years.

In July 2004 Decima set her sails for the first time in over 15 years, and has since been seen regularly around the East coast.   She has recently been based at Heybridge Basin, and in 2010 Wilkin and Son Ltd of Tiptree, Essex, (the famous makers of jams, marmalades, and conserves), became her sponsors.   Consequently the Tiptree logo has been displayed in her topsail.

According to the advertisement Decima is now at Faversham.   Here’s the link to the advertisement on the Apollo Duck website.

Thanks to the Decima website for the following interesting titbits from her history:-

“Things have not always run smoothly for Decima.   She has had many mishaps in her long history.   Most notably in 1938, during a severe gale, her crew abandoned her off Great Yarmouth, and she sailed herself across the North Sea to Holland!   She was relatively unscathed, and was returned to England where she was repaired and returned to work.   On November 17th 1940 she was swamped and sank whilst at anchor off Southend pier with a deck cargo of timber.   She was re-floated, refitted, and once again was put back to work!”  

Cambria’s horseshoe leads to the story of a war-time barge

Well here’s an interesting post on the Cambria website’s blog!

How amazing it is the way things come to light.   When Cambria was being restored a horseshoe was found attached to the wheelhouse.   An appeal was made to try to discover how it came to be there, but nobody seemed to know.

Then recently William Collard came up with an answer  –  a good luck symbol, being the shoe worn by a famous racehorse.   He found the information in a collection of articles called ‘Thames at War’ by Bernard Drew.   The blog goes on to quote an extract from the articles about a trip on board Cambria that Mr Drew took in WW2 when “Cully” Tovell was skipper.   It is a fascinating account of life and work on a Thames sailing barge in war-time.   And, interesting for me, the other two members of the crew came from Grays. 

Here’s the link to the post on the Cambria blog.     

 

Dinah at St Kat’s

Tim Kent has taken these pictures of Dinah at St Katherine’s Dock. He says:-

“We’ve been joined at St Kat’s by the very cute miniature barge Dinah.”

 with Paul and Jasmine Armour-Marshall

Ironsides – out of dry dock and sailing in 2014 season

At last week’s SSBR Committee meeting we talked about sb Ironsides and heard that Toby Lester, owner of Ironsides, hoped to have her sailing again this summer, with more restoration work after that.   A lot of new steel has been put into the barge.

Today the Ironsides Facebook page has noted that she is about to come out of dry dock and has published a series of photos of the restoration.   It says:-

“Ironsides  –  So far this has been a very busy week as we are due to leave the dry dock next week, so lots of anti-foul and painting has been done inside and out, but hopefully she is now looking smart.    Next job the rigging.  “

Here are the facts about Ironsides  –  Staysail Class;  Bob:- Swallowtail with ‘tower’ emblem on blue ground.   Official No 112710, 78 ton;  Built of Dutch iron at West Thurrock in 1900 by Clarke  & Stanfield;  85 x 20.3 x 6.4.    Owned by A.P.C.M. and sold to L.R.T.C. in 1928;  she was converted to a motor barge in 1938 and traded to northern France.    She was sold to Alan Reekie in 1968;   re-rigged at Brentford and became a successful racing and charter barge.    Afterwards owned by Mark Tower, she was based at Maldon / St Katherine’s.   From 2003 she has been at Faversham for refitting.   Now owned by Toby Lester and Linda Hoy who plan to have her sailing this year after an extensive refurbishment to her hull, deck and topsides.

We wish Toby and Ironsides all the best for the sailing season.

Photos courtesy of sb Ironsides.

  

Victor’s Mate Bev

Here’s an interesting read from the East Anglian Daily Times website, (EADT24).   It’s about the female Mate of the sb Victor.   This is the link.

A few ladies might have something to say about it.