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Going, going …… River Thames pier up for auction.

Many thanks to Gravesend resident and SSBR Vice Chairman, Roger Newlyn, for bringing to my attention an advertisement for the sale of West Street Pier.

The pier has been the Kent terminal of the Tilbury – Gravesend Ferry for as long as I can remember.   In my young days the foot ferry was surpassed by the vehicle ferry used by Essex people on their way to the south coast holiday resorts.   This involved many hours queued on the Tilbury side to drive downPier-West-Street-300x198 on to the pontoon and then on to the boat, or on the return journey lined up along West Street which seemed in those long lost days much narrower, much darker, and, dare I say, rather seedy.   Somehow though it all added to the excitement of the holiday.

When the car ferry was no more  –  after the opening of the first Purfleet – Dartford tunnel  –  the passenger ferry had the use of the pier with just a narrow exit on to West Street.   But it was shared with the Princess Pocahontas as the base for her pleasure trips up and down the river.   Then the construction of the pontoon at the Town Pier meant the ferry transferred to that, and the West Street Pier stood empty and deteriorating.

The advertisement is from Network Auctions and is headlined “Rare River Thames pier to be sold at auction”.   It appears the sale is on behalf of the receivers and is to take place in London on 28th February.    Stuart Elliott, the auctioneer, says it is a rare and unusual opportunity for buyers, “How often can you purchase a pier on the Thames!”   The guide price is £55,000 plus.   The freehold pier is being sold with a separate adjacent vacant office building.   According to the auctioneer the pier offers redevelopment opportunities ,subject to planning.

There is an historical plaque at the site recording it as one of the South East’s oldest transport routes.   Originally there were two routes, the “Long Ferry” between Gravesend and London, and the “Cross Ferry” over to Essex.

In 1401 King Henry IV granted the Gravesend townspeople sole rights to operate the Long Ferry.   At first sailing “Tilt” boats were used, with paddle steamers being introduced in 1815, but the growth of the railways meant the Long Ferry went into decline around the middle of the nineteenth century.

The Cross Ferry is even older, being recorded in the Domesday Book of 1083.   Wherry rowing boats were used until they were replaced by a small steam tug in the 1840s, and by paddle steamers in 1856.

Roger feels West Street Pier is not the bargain that it seems as there have been expensive problems with the structure in the last few years.

Here’s the link to the advertisement.

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Hugh gets to work with the polish

Dave Brooks has provided this terrific photo of Hugh Perks cleaning Cambria’s brass.   Good old Hugh, helping out.   Mind you, fellow SSBR Committee Member, Roger Newlyn says, “What you have to do to get a turn on the wheel!!”

Hugh Perks cleans Cambria's brass (DB)

Pudge and Centaur get ready for the season

Roger Newlyn sends us news that Pudge left Faversham last weekend, Sunday the 1st of April, following  completion of the shipwright’s work, and she arrived back in Maldon on  the evening flood tide.    Work has now commenced on fitting out the restored  stern section down below.    Her gear was being lowered this weekend for routine  maintenance, ready for the forthcoming season.

Meanwhile Good Friday saw Centaur  rigging out alongside Pudge, preparing for her shakedown  sail.

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