Category Archives: sb Pudge

Pudge to be at Ipswich Maritime Festival

There’s a chance this weekend to have a look on board a Dunkirk Little Ship, sb Pudge.IpsMaritFest

Pudge is going to the Ipswich Maritime Festival and you can visit her there on Saturday 15th and Sunday 16th August.   She will be moored at Orwell Quay, Ipswich, and will be open to the public from 10.30 to 18.00 each day.   Entry on board is free, although donations to the Thames Sailing Barge Trust, which owns and maintains Pudge, will be very welcome and will go towards her upkeep.

If you’re in the Ipswich area this weekend, do pay Pudge a visit and find out about the story of her involvement at Dunkirk.

Here’s the link to the Maritime Festival’s website, which has all the details.

Nice story about Thames barges in Telegraph article

There’s a good article in The Daily Telegraph about Thames barges.   Written by Adam Lusher, it describes his joining the crew of Centaur for the 2013 Pin Mill Match.

Adam was clearly smitten by the barges:-

“As the red ochre sails clustered around the mouth of the Orwell, it was as if the river had returned to the days when the Thames sailing barge was the East Coast’s cargo vessel of choice, not the giant container vessels that now unload at Felixstowe, more maritime tower blocks than ships.   It felt all the more dreamlike because it had seemed so improbable.”

He joined Mate, Chris Martin, on a winch but not for long:-

“…….paying crew members can choose their own activity level.   Those who wish can take a turn at the winch.   The seriously enthusiastic can train to be mates and skippers.   Others, however, prefer to help cook lunch or simply to admire the view.

“I strongly recommend the latter.   When your smiling crewmate offers you a winch handle, remember that the leeboards both weigh 1.5 muscle-sapping tons.   I lasted precisely one tack, before I gasped my excuses and abandoned my station.”

Here’s Adam taking a turn on the winch with mate, Chris Martin.

Adam Lusher has a turn at the winch with mate Chris Martin, Telegraph piece on Centaur in 2013 Pinmill Match

We would just point out to Adam, though, that tremendous as TSBT’s work with Centaur and Pudge is, there are other Trusts working hard to preserve individual barges, several of them now proudly sailing as members of the active fleet.  

Here’s the link to the full story.   Well worth a read.

Jennifer thinks Thames bargemen are the best – especially her Dad!

We were delighted today to hear from Jennifer Franks.   This is what she says:-

“I am 68 now, but spent lots of time in my childhood on my Dad’s barge.   In those days there was the Azima, then later the Ardwina.   My brother was on the Pudge.  

“My Dad took part in lots of barge matches on the Sirdar and Mirosa, amongst others, and often sailed the Sirdar advertising Bell’s whisky.   In 1964, when the Queen opened the new Forth Bridge, my Dad sailed the Sirdar under it.   I’ve got the photos and newspaper reports.

“My Dad was fabulous and, as far as I am concerned, Thames bargemen are the best  –  after my Dad of course!”

 
 

Good field for the Blackwater Match

Plenty of wind for the Blackwater Match on Saturday, and it attracted a good ???????????????????????????????????????????field in all classes.

The Match was well advertised on the Quay and Promenade at Maldon, but it was disappointing that so few people were at either place for when the barges returned.   Probably the time, the last one arrived at about 5.30pm, and the very cold wind by then put them off.   Certainly, apart from The Barge Blog, there were only two people at the far end of the Promenade by the statue who knew what was happening.

???????????????????????????????????????????Here’s Hythe Quay as the barges returned afterwards, and some adjustment as Pudge is put away for the night.

Click here for the Results, courtesy of the Sailing Barge Association.

Open Days on Centaur and Pudge

The Thames Sailing Barge Trust will be holding two Open Days on Sunday 5th May Pudge 12th March 2012 (27)and Monday 6th May.

Why not visit them at Maldon Quay and have a guided tour of their two Thames Barges, Pudge and Centaur.

Admission is free, but donations will be gratefully received to help keep the barges sailing.

Sunday 5th May  –  The world Centaur (TSBT photofamous Maldon Mud Race takes place so there will be lots to see and do.   Barges open from 11 am.

Monday 6th May  –  There will be shanty singers performing on board throughout the day.   Barges open from 10.30am.

There will be displays showing the work of the Thames Sailing Barge Trust on board and refreshments will be available.

The Trust looks forward to welcoming you aboard.

Swale Match – closely fought and exciting

The general opinion seems to be that this year’s Swale Match,

Swale Barge Match fleet 2012

held last Saturday, was the best race of the season.   And it had a “newcomer” in that Niagara took part, less than a week after she returned to the active barge fleet.

Hugh Perks sent us this very welcome Match report:-

“The Match started in light airs east, soon getting up SE and just up to Force 6 for the run home.

Cabby made the fastest start, 20 seconds after the gun.  There were some thrilling finishes. 

Mirosa and Marjorie taking it right down to the wire

In the bowsprit class Mirosa beat Marjorie by the tip of her bowsprit, (half a second between them).  3rd was Lady of the Lea, (the only other bowsprit barge), which incurred a 5 hour penalty for starting 15 minutes early with the staysail barges, and was banned from entering public houses for the next two years. 

In the Staysail Class Niagara and Repertor were neck and neck at the finish, with Repertor one second ahead.  After a protest on the matter of something earlier in the match, Repertor was given a 5 minute time penalty, giving Niagara the victory.   Decima was 3rd, getting the Percy Wildish Cup which was fittingly presented by “Beefy” Wildish’s son.

Repertor and Niagara fighting for the line

Restricted Staysails went to Cabby, (in spite of also incurring a time penalty).  There was a close finish for 2nd place between Phoenician and Orinoco, (27 seconds), but it was given to Orinoco as Phoenician had failed to go round one of the marks.   3rd was Greta and 4th Pudge.

The fastest smack was Alberta, but on handicap went to Emeline.

Around 70 vessels took part in the match.”

(Photos by Dave Brooks)

 

It’s a barge, but not quite as we know it

The thing about The Barge Blog, the SSBR Facebook page, and the websites and pages of the individual barges is you learn a tremendous amount from them.   Between us, we have contributors and “commenters” who are not slow in coming forward to give us information about the snippets of news we feature, or photographs we publish where we don’t know very much about them.  And speaking from The Barge Blog perspective, we are very glad that they do.

This week, for example, Ryan Dale has posted a link to a picture, and has said, “not a Thames barge but it’s a spritsail rig in Italy!!”

He gave this link to the Caravan Stage Company which performs on the deck of a 30 metre tall ship as the Caravan Stage Tall Ship Theatre.   The boat, the Amara Zee, is based on the traditional design of a Thames Sailing Barge, and has the best of contemporary marine and theatre technology. With its shallow draft of 1.2 metres and its self-lowering masts via on-deck winches the boat can access virtually any waterfront community.  The Amara Zee uses the masts and rigging for the scenery, light and sound equipment and special effects.   The shows are staged on the entire deck, on the masts and rigging, on the water and land surrounding the vessel with the audience sitting on the shore.

It was not long before Martin Phillips joined in to tell us:-   “She was built in Canada, I believe by a guy called John Dearden who was a bargeman in the UK.   I sailed with him on Pudge back in the early 70s, (when I was a teenager), and I think that he had got involved with the TBSC through Silvertown Lighterage which ran May, Ethel and other barges at the time for Tate & Lyle.   John emigrated, (not sure but I think he went to Montreal when the May or the Ethel were shipped over there and decided to stay).   He started his own shipyard which designed and built this Thames Barge.   This is not a new thing because actually barges were built for UK trade in Sweden and Holland in the old days!!   It might be worth mentioning this to Geoff Harris as he went to Canada on May too, so I am sure he knows about John Dearden.”

 

 

Pudge and Centaur get ready for the season

Roger Newlyn sends us news that Pudge left Faversham last weekend, Sunday the 1st of April, following  completion of the shipwright’s work, and she arrived back in Maldon on  the evening flood tide.    Work has now commenced on fitting out the restored  stern section down below.    Her gear was being lowered this weekend for routine  maintenance, ready for the forthcoming season.

Meanwhile Good Friday saw Centaur  rigging out alongside Pudge, preparing for her shakedown  sail.

Dry dock turnround – Pudge out, Cambria in

At the SSBR Committee meeting on Saturday, Roger Newlyn told us that Pudge would be back in the water on Monday, and then there would be about three weeks’ more work to be done on her.   True to this, Roger has today sent us this picture of Pudge with the message, “Pudge after swapping places with Cambria in the Faversham dry dock yesterday”.

We wish Pudge and her team all the best for her completion and return to the fleet.