Watch “The Quay” – a film by Richard Fleury

This film is well worth watching.   It’s the story of Standard Quay at Faversham, and tells how the Quay was home to some of the last of the shipwrights and other craftsmen, whose services are still in demand.   A developer has applied for planning permission for housing on the quay, and this film is about the traditional working shipyard’s final year

“The Quay”, is a film by Richard Fleury:   “A windswept stretch of English creekside echoing to marsh birds’ calls and the thud of shipwrights’ hammers, Standard Quay is straight from Dickens.    Wooden ships have been built and rebuilt here for a thousand years and, to some, this scruffy wharf is a magical vision of living history.

“A centre for ancient maritime crafts, the quay is a haven for the few dozen surviving Thames sailing barges.   But Standard Quay’s latest owner, a property developer, plans to turn it into a tourist trap with shops, restaurants and luxury houses.   “The Quay” is the story of a traditional working shipyard’s final year.”

Here’s the link to the film on YouTube.

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Posted on 19/08/2012, in Films and Videos, Standard Quay and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. It is very sad that the landowner’s wish to develop the site has destroyed what had been developed at Standard Quay however I feel that the coverage of this to date rather ignores reality of what has been achieved by the Thames barge and trad boat community in East Anglia.

    It is depressing to read such statements as

    “A centre for ancient maritime crafts, the quay is a haven for the few dozen surviving Thames sailing barges. But Standard Quay’s latest owner, a property developer, plans to turn it into a tourist trap with shops, restaurants and luxury houses….”

    This publicity would give the impression that this was the last home of sailing barges and that the preservation skills of barge shipwrights and the home of barges has been destroyed for good by a property developer’s greed.

    However this is simply a false picture. What had been achieved at Faversham in the comparatively recent past particularly around the rebuild of Cambria was great and of course Tim Goldsack is still operating his business (albeit not at Standard Quay). The Iron Wharf is still thriving as are the regular Faversham barges Mirosa and Repertor and Lady of the Lea.

    Why can’t someone make an optimistic film publicising the achievements of the TBST (formerly the barge club) in keeping its barges sailing over the last 64 years, rebuilding two (Pudge and Centaur) WITHOUT Lottery support and taking thousands of people sailing? The Trusts third hand/mate training has produced about 8 of the current Sailing Barge masters (including myself). It has done so much good to preserve barges and helped to bring people into the barge scene who go on to work on barges. Lets celebrate this success please!

    Maldon and the Blackwater are home to a very active fleet of barges and two barge yard (Cooks and Blackwater Marina) with blocks and 2 drydocks operating. Then there is Andy Harman’s yard at St Osyth not to forget the Pioneer rebuild and all the smacks. TS rigging has a thriving trad boat business (rerigging the Cutty Sark for example) and there is a host of evidence that the area is a hot bed of traditional skills and specialist shipwrights, riggers, metal workers, a blacksmith and much much more all based around the rich maritime heritage of the area. Topsail Charters have built a successful business over a quarter of a century preserving a fleet of active barges carrying thousands of passengers a year and employing a group of skippers and mates.

    Then there are the barges themselves and the unseen efforts and huge financial commitments of private owners that has produced the wonderful sight of beautifully restored and maintained barge like Marjorie, Adieu, Edith May, Lady Daphne, Repertor, Wyvenhoe, Lady of the Lea and Phoenician and many others . Private owners are rebuilding barge like Melissa and Niagara, Ethel Maud etc, with more on the way and two new builds completed and more on the way.

    I deplore the problems that have ruined all Brian Pain’s efforts to achieve a laudable goal but the picture is far from gloomy! Traditional skills are actually thriving in East Anglia and the fleet of barges and smacks is an often unpublicised gem. Where else in the UK has a fleet of traditional craft in their home waters been preserved and transformed from cargo carriers and fishing boats to working and pleasure vessels?

    Yes what happened at Standard Quay was bad for one person’s dream and destroyed his hopes for the future. I dare say it was undoubtedly bad for Faversham – but that is quite a big issue and no doubt many will debate what is best for the town and the use of its creek for many years to come.

    Lets celebrate what we are really achieving guys! Please can someone make a film to show what has been achieved and what a wonderful tradition we have kept going. Tell the public and above all encourage them to join in and come sailing on our wonderful craft.

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  2. Thank you, Martin, for your very thoughtful comment. As an East Anglian myself, I agree with a great deal of what you say. I have often thought that some of the leaders of the barge community only think about the Kent/Medway area, and pay little attention to Essex and Suffolk. I would suggest that Maldon is just as much the centre of the sailing barge world, with, as you say, barge yards and craftsmen and the sight of a number of barges lying alongside every day of the year. But then, we in Essex are used to being either ignored or ridiculed. We know that we have some absolute gems in both coast and country.

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